Nutrition

How to cheaply include huge amounts of live probiotics in your diet

by making your own yoghurt

by copyright 2017 Healing Cancer Naturally

For some of the numerous benefits ranging from immune system and mood enhancement to weight loss, see Probiotics.

While it is always possible to spend large amounts of money on various probiotics supplements, by far the least expensive, surest and easiest way to incorporate billions of beneficial live gut bacteria in your diet (in fact many billions more than any supplement could ever provide) consists in freshly fermenting your own yoghurt (both from milk or vegan milk substitutes) at home.

Personally I use a high-quality probiotics supplement in capsules which guarantees "live" or "active" cultures (which I store in the fridge) and a one-quart yoghurt maker (available online and in specialty stores).

To make my homemade yoghurt brimming with live probiotics, I open one capsule, pour the powdery content in my yoghurt maker and top it up with milk, allowing it to ferment for some hours during which the bacteria multiply, "turning" the milk in the process.

For each of the next batches, I use about a tablespoon of the ready-made yoghurt as a starter until a batch begins to taste somewhat off (such as acquiring a cheesy taste) at which point I start with a fresh capsule. In this manner, a container of say 60 probiotic capsules will easily last me a year or two, depending on how often I prepare a series of batches.

You will notice that fermenting time differs - the more starter yoghurt or powder (starter culture) you use, the quicker the entire batch is transformed into yoghurt.

You can use this to your advantage in that if you are in a hurry to have another batch ready, simply increase the amount of starter you use (incidentally, this also saves electricity).

If ever you leave your batch fermenting longer than required to reach a yoghurt-like consistency, you will see the protein part of the milk separating more and more from the watery part (the whey) until eventually you will have a lump of white cheese swimming in a "lake" of whey. In this case, one can drink the whey and use the cheese in any way preferred.

Since you have live cultures, this separation process actually can continue even when you keep your yoghurt in the refrigerator. Generally, you can leave your yoghurt outside the fridge for some days since the lactic acid bacteria tend to suppress all other would-be invaders.

More tips on yoghurt making under The basis of Dr. Budwig’s oil-protein diet How to make the flaxseed oil plus cottage cheese/quark mixture.

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